Binge Eating and Compulsive Overeating

By Mizpah Matus B.Hlth.Sc(Hons)

Background




The Binge Eating and Compulsive Overeating Workbook : An Integrated Approach to Overcoming Disordered Eating is written by Carolyn Ross, M.D.

This book is designed to help those that have a problem with binge eating disorders to heal their destructive relationships with food and regain control of their lives and health. It covers the underlying causes of binge eating and will help you to determine how certain foods and different emotions can trigger overeating.

Binge Eating Diet Basics

binge-eating-and-compulsive-overeatingThis workbook provides practical solutions for those who struggle with binge eating and compulsive overeating. Firstly binge eating and compulsive overeating are defined so that readers can understand and recognize these conditions.

Ross then takes the reader through a series of quizzes and exercises that are intended to increase awareness of negative patterns so as to open a path for healing to occur. You will learn to identify the role of trigger foods, emotional imbalances, stress, depression and anxiety.

You are encouraged to examine your ideas about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ foods and to realize that all foods have potential good and bad qualities. For example, chocolate can be seen as a bad food due to its high content of sugar and fat but dark chocolate that contains over 60% cocoa can actually have beneficial effects on health when consumed in moderation.

Information on nutrition basics is provided so that you can understand the true needs of your body. Ross outlines four principles of healthy eating:

  1. No food is bad Food
  2. Eat fresh unprocessed foods
  3. Balance intestinal flora
  4. Maximize nutrition with supplements

A major element of the Binge Eating and Compulsive Overeating Workbook involves learning how to deal with stress. Stress management and relaxation techniques are introduced that will help you to find ways to cope with stress that do not involve food.

Recommended Foods

Fruit, vegetables, oatmeal, whole grain bread, pasta, shrimp, fish, chicken, eggs, avocado, walnut, flaxseed, peanut butter, milk, yogurt, tofu, beans, dark chocolate.

Sample Diet Plan

Breakfast

Oatmeal
Fruit salad
Low fat yogurt

Lunch

Chicken breast
Vegetable medley

Dinner

4 oz salmon with lemon pepper
Green salad with olive oil dressing

Exercise Recommendations

The major focus of The Binge Eating and Compulsive Overeating Workbook is on nutrition and avoiding overeating. While Ross discusses the role of physical inactivity in increasing rates of obesity she does not offer any guidance for exercise in this book.

Costs and Expenses

The Binge Eating and Compulsive Overeating Workbook : An Integrated Approach to Overcoming Disordered Eating retails at $21.95.

Pros

  • Provides unique information that specifically applies to those who have a problem with binge eating.
  • Teaches dieters how to deal with trigger foods and emotions that may cause overeating.
  • Addresses the root cause of weight gain rather than providing just a temporary solution.
  • Acknowledges the importance of stress management.
  • Less expensive than undertaking counseling sessions.
  • Educates readers about basic nutrition.
  • Author is a medical practitioner.

Cons

  • Will not apply to readers who do not suffer from binge eating.
  • Does not address the importance of exercise for weight management.
  • Does not include a meal plan or recipes.

Conclusions

The Binge Eating and Compulsive Overeating Workbook will help those who struggle with these issues to learn to appreciate and accept their bodies. Unfortunately Ross fails to mention the importance of exercise for health and readers may overlook its potential benefits for weight management and emotional balance.

Nonetheless this book offers a great deal of practical advice that will greatly improve your ability to manage stress and will help you to replace unhealthy habits with behaviors that will support and nourish both your body and spirit.

By Mizpah Matus B.Hlth.Sc(Hons)
  • verna taylor

    I have probably lost that same hundred lbs a thousand times in my life.I can only speak for myself but I hardly think that i am unique. I am convinced that my emotional and mental attitude,and my prception of many things , has been the root to why I am a compulsive over eater.I do believe being addicted to carbs plays a part. Choice also is part of the equation.I once again am trying to lose weight and regain my phsical health. I also am working on my emotional and mental health. Getting to know me. Being honest with myself and my views on my past,present and future. I am setting goals with a plan of action to meet those goals. Things like blood pressure, blood sugar and emotional well being. So basically lots of journaling and lots of spilling my thoughts and heart on paper. Its for my eyes only. I hope to filter this thing called life through mercy, grace and truth. I will ask for the enabling spirit of God to help me stand. I want to build that relationship . I hope the best for each of you that struggle as I do.

  • Vicki

    I have had a weight problem all my life. Have tried all diets. Even had gastric bypass and I failed at that. I am a binge eater and can almost eat anything in site when I get in those moods. I can’t walk because I have bad knees. So it seems I can’t loose the weight because I can’t walk. It is a vicious circle. What can a person do????

    • Penny

      You say you can’t exercise because you have bad knees — everyone can walk! Even with bad knees, a slow, steady gait in very comfortable shoes is low impact and you will increase your tolerance with time. And if you live near a park or school, most of them have a cushioned track. YMCAs also have them, and are available in all,types of weather.

      Another thing– YMCAs have indoor pools and water aerobics! Great exercise and workouts, with ZERO impact on your knees. Plus the camaraderie of other people, and other programs the Y offers…I guess the point is that you DO have options. Good luck!

  • Linda

    i have come to the conclusion that the only way i am going to lose weight is to wish for cancer or to get HIV/Aids on purpose. I take chronic medication and have yet to find a diet for people who take chronic medication. People who lose weight are the people who don’t have an under active thyroid and are not taking anti depressants and mood stabilizers. It is just not fair!

    • Penny

      “It’s not fair” — is a cop out, and you are only doing yourself a disservice. Many people Are overweight, and many, many people are so because of medications. I gained 100 pounds because I contracted Fibromyalgia (wasn’t able to keep up with my own workout routines, nor could I keep up with my typical work schedule). Add to that the meds for FM — Lyrica and some others caused my weight to skyrocket!

      I whined and cried and acted like a big ninny and it took a year to decide that whining wasn’t going to help. I talked with my dr., we made some medication changes and now I’m going to have barbaric surgery. It’s a decision we made together–not in haste but as a team.

      If you are are on meds, it will change your eating habits, metabolism, exercise, etc. but you can have some control. If the side effects are too extreme, there are always alternatives. And you can have the discussions with your dr. That’s always the best way to start.

      • me

        That’s not quite fair.
        I’m nearly 30 and am now disabled as well as obese. And deal every day with people who have this mentality- “Oh there must be a way!” “You’re just whining” “When you decide to lose weight you will!”.
        I’d lost 80lbs by treating a hormone issue. I’ve never been a glutton or stupid about nutrition. No one even believed me about the issue until the weight fell off the second it was treated- they all said the same thing, “Don’t make excuses!”

        Then a medicine (similar to lyrica) made me gain 100. I couldn’t lose it no matter what, and apparently that’s common from that medicine.

        Then I started needing multiple surgeries for a chronic condition.
        I’m nearly bedridden (have been over a year now), am not allowed to cook other than microwave, and am on SNAP because I can’t work (those two mean getting fresh food is expensive and a challenge). I can work out 10 min a day with help.
        My doctors say weightloss might help, but I’m not a good candidate for bariatric surgery, and they don’t know what to tell me. (And these are top doctors are research hospitals).

        And STILL now people tell me “There’s always something you can do! No medicine will mess you up for that long! Get active, get energized!”

        The attitude that it’s a choice, that sheer will alone will turn things around? Makes for great movies, but isn’t always true.

        Some of us do our best, but our best can’t do much. I know you didn’t mean to offend, but please just keep it in mind that you are VERY lucky. Some of us with chronic conditions are not so much.

        While “Linda”‘s thought process isn’t healthy, I totally understand it. Sometimes your body doesn’t act as a healthy body would act. Sometimes it IS out of your control, but everyone assumes it’s about your choices and your determination, but there actually isn’t anything you can do.

        Sometimes “it’s not fair” isn’t just a cop out, it’s absolutely true.

      • Penny

        I’m so sorry! I have autocorrect– that should say “bariatric” — not “barbaric” !! Lol….although by the time it’s all finished it might seem barbaric!!

    • Chris

      “wish for cancer or to get HIV/Aids on purpose”

      You’ve got more than weight issues.

  • karen presnell

    i am 48 an i have a weight promblem,it seems i may be going threw menpause!an to weeks befor i start..i eat/eat an crave sweets i try to con trol it an its so hard,i do good if it ant around cycle time,i try to go to the jym 3 days aweek,i walk i no twice a week.i notice iv slowed down alot i love to hike to..but how often an how long should i do the treadmill/i have no trainer so im not sure what to do..i wont to loose belly fat,,will thai diet help me an how long do you stay on it/befor you notice.i wont to loose 20 pounds1!thank so much

  • joyce

    i have gained a lot of weight and i am miserable i can’t stand to look at myself i have tried a lot of thing that didn’t work. i have this six week training program to help you lose weight. i haven’t gotten started yet i just don’t have the energy to do so i am 52 years and i pray and ask god to give me the energy becausd i can’t dot on my own. tried of being fat…

    • kiki

      Take baby steps to work yourself into a program. Most people would not do well going from one extreme to another. As an example, commit yourself to exercise twice in your first week, eat at least two servings of vegetables at each meal, and give up half of the sweetened beverages that would normally be consumed. Then in your second week, commit to exercise 3 or 4 times, switch half of your carbs to whole grain carbs (not white), cut out junkfood except for once or twice when you pre plan to have it (a single serving), as well as the diet changes you made in week one. You will still see results, and you’ll be less likely to quit or put it off.

    • kim

      Hi Joyce
      I could have written your exact words. Have you doe anything about it? I’m looking for some support. kim

  • Haven

    im 12 and i recently had anorexia and then one day my Dad took me to a Buffet and i cuoldnt stop eating because of the starvation i put myself thru (i planned to try to lose the weight but i thought “well im skinny it wont hurt that much” untill every day i did it. So today I am tring again and i put myself on a diet. Anyways to all the people who suffer with obesity or bulimia and even anerexia, Just fricken Stop. God is helping me, he can help you too. God is in control not you. As worldy people we need to repent and ask for forgivness. I am living to tell so can you.

    • Annonymous

      I’m 16 in a weeks time and i was diagnosed with anorexia at age 13. Recently i achieved a healthy weight but i’m finding it extremely hard to maintain it. This is probably the worst year of my life thanks to my e.d. I’ve binged many times now and each time they get worse and so do my emotions. I always tell myself that i won’t let it happen again but a few weeks down the line, i find history repeating itself ;(
      I’ve tried speaking to family&friends, and to my therapist, i’ve prayed to God but these things don’t go away over night…unfortunately. The fact that i have no control over my desires to eat food, is sickening. Wtf is wrong with me?!!! I need this to go. Like i said, im going to be 16 soon, and i’m in a desperate situation. I feel reassured knowing i’m not the only person going through this however i do wish that no-one has to suffer like this. I should be grateful i’ve got the ability to live a good life! I wish it was easy to accept my own words and act upon them. To anyone who reads this, and if you believe in a God, please pray that God forgives us for not being grateful enough and content for what we have. Please pray that anyone with an e.d finds it easier to leave their bad, unhealthy diets and lifestyles. If you have not had an e.d and aren’t close to someone with one, then you’ll think this is pathetic and i’m making problems for myself. But this is a struggle and like my Mum says, ‘it’s a test from God’. Tests of any kind, are always tough right?

      • Jenn

        Everything you said could have come from my mouth. I am 40 years old and have felt this way since I was 14. It is a miserable life. I have been apologizing to God daily for being so ungrateful for the beautiful life that I have. Why does this consume me? I have no idea. So very tired of it though. I wish I could just let it go, some days I do…but it always creeps back. PLEASE get help for yourself as you are still so young. Don’t spend your life obsessed like me.

      • ted

        ED’s aren’t “tests from God” God loves you and doesn’t put those he loves through tests. ED’s are the result of irrational views of self and worth which started at a very early age. You need to work through those issues, food and eating are just symptoms of the real underlying problem. Hang in there sweetie.